Craniofacial and Microsurgery Subspecialties | OSU Wexner Medical Center

Author: Ohio State Wexner Medical Center

Having trained in both craniofacial surgery as well as microvascular surgery I have a unique skill set in which to help my patients. Craniofacial surgery is founded on principles of form and function in which we are essentially rebuilding the skeletal structure of the head and neck. Microsurgery on the other hand often involves us transferring tissue from one part of the body to another and using small blood vessels in the head and neck or elsewhere to restore blood flow to those what we call flaps. The way to use both of those techniques together has really been an emerging field in plastic surgery. Whether you are a patient who has a congenital anomaly where the face is not symmetric and you're lacking bone and soft tissue, we can actually use both craniofacial surgery and microsurgery to transfer tissue from your leg or from your arm to the head and neck to restore things such as the jawbone or to restore function such as facial reanimation in patients with facial paralysis. Another area where we use these two together is reconstructing the head and neck after a cancer operation as in patients that have squamous cell cancer or basal cell cancer of the head and neck.

These patients often have a history of smoking or alcohol use and may present to a head and neck surgeon or otolaryngologist for cancer resection and they can be reconstructed by either a head and neck surgeon or by a plastic surgeon. By combining both craniofacial surgery and microvascular surgery I work on trying to get the flap to live but also putting it in a functional position for you after surgery. Some of the congenital malformations that we treat include hemangiomas and vascular malformations that may require a resection, and with the resection they may destroy normal functions such as eye movement, or lip movement or even facial nerve function. One of the areas that we can reconstruct is the facial nerve and that does require some microvascular precision as well as a craniofacial background. Other areas that we treat for patients with congenital anomalies include patients that come in with something called Treacher Collins syndrome or stickler syndrome or they may actually come in with something called Parry-Romberg syndrome, which is a progressive disease. Additionally we also treat patients just with large nevus or something called panda nevus as well as sebaceous cysts of the scalp as well and the head and neck. We can also treat these areas on the extremities.

Craniofacial and Microsurgery Subspecialties | OSU Wexner Medical Center

Having trained in both craniofacial surgery as well as microvascular surgery I have a unique skill set in which to help my patients. Craniofacial surgery is founded on principles of…

By: Ohio State Wexner Medical Center